nescz

Eliseo Carranza Carranza itibaren Neuvicq, Fransa itibaren Neuvicq, Fransa

Okuyucu Eliseo Carranza Carranza itibaren Neuvicq, Fransa

Eliseo Carranza Carranza itibaren Neuvicq, Fransa

nescz

Eğlenceli bir şeye ihtiyacım vardı ve bu tasarıma uyuyor!

nescz

Bu Cormac McCarthy'nin ilk kitabımdı ve yazamadım. İki ana karakter arasındaki ilişki güzel bir şekilde anlatılmıştır. Hızlı, karanlık, melankolik ve umutlu, hikaye harika bir kombinasyon oluşturuyor.

nescz

"Beni bir arada tutan her şey önümdeki yerde, en küçük parçalara bölündü. Dünyada her zaman olsaydım, onu asla bir araya getirip yapıştıramadım." (p224) Bu, bir oturuşta bitirdiğim karanlık ve hızlı bir okuma; Kaçıştan zevk aldım. Ben de herhangi bir cevap vermeden bitmiş yolu sevdim.

nescz

From Publishers Weekly In this somewhat desultory but affecting autobiography, Yep ( Dragonwings ) describes himself as a collection of disparate puzzle pieces: a Chinese-American raised in a black neighborhood, a child too American to fit into Chinatown and too Chinese to fit in anywhere else. Writing, he explains, has conferred on him the role of puzzle-solver, allowing him imaginatively to join and even reinvent the pieces. Among the most notable figures in Yep's unassuming narrative are his hardworking, indomitable parents, owners of a grocery that requires their unflagging attention, and his Chinatown grandmother, the model for several characters in his novels. Occasional flashes of humor or whimsy--an eccentric chemistry teacher's antics, the revelation that Yep wrote his Mark Twain books to the music of the B-52s--enliven the mix. Ages 11-13. Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc.

nescz

A great insight into China's cultural revolution. Highly recomended because it is a good read and it's a time in recent history that we should all know a bit about. (don't worry, even if you don't agree with what Jan Wong writes about in her Globe column, you'll still like this book)

nescz

Fun to read while in NYC. Wish I was reading it while also in front of youtube, instead of on the subway -- the book is full of references to supposedly amaaaazing sketches and occurrences for which reader-familiarity is assumed. Most of the book is about starting the show and the cast of the first few years, and spends increasingly less time as it gets to current day. Never actually gets to current current day. It ends when Tina Fey and Jimmy Fallon are doing Update. It reads like a transcript of spoken interviews, largely unedited. So you have all the ways people hesitate and repeat themselves in everyday speech, which can get annoying to read. Also, many people's opinions overlapped, so basically you hear from a bajillion different people how they all loved Gilda Radner and Chris Farley and hated Chevy Chase and feared Lorne Michaels. This is OK when there is an interesting anecdote that accompanies the opinion, but a lot just comes off as show business hyperbole and fluff. This book could have been four stars with a better editor and more journalistic chops to the writing. The authors actual prose is probably only 5% of the text. Just write that five people named so-and-so all had such-and-such opinion in common. Don't just quote them each individually in succession saying basically the same thing all in a row. Bruce Campbell should have written this book. It would have been awesome.